archives

Archive for

Lithium Batteries – The Future of Power by Peter F Hughes

 

Battery storage has been around for many years. There is nothing more annoying than a dead battery on a cold day! Used in the mining industry, in motor vehicles, boats, phones and for solar energy storage, batteries are a part of our everyday life. And this is where the problem lies, consumers are reliant on batteries. Recycling of our original lead acid batteries was both time consuming and expensive. Some companies such as RACV, NRMA and Battery World offered a replacement service where they would attend to your vehicle, replace the dead battery with a new one and recycle the old battery for you. This was a very innovative service.

The increased use of caravans, boats, camper vans and trailers has also seen an increased use in batteries. Most travelers now carry refrigerators with them and many are using batteries for remote travel. The introduction of solar panels has seen an increased use in battery storage. It could be argued with our superior days of sun and daylight, Australia is one of the largest users of solar energy in the world!

Up until recently, the only way to store that solar energy was in a traditional lead acid or amalgamated glass mat (AGM) battery. These batteries are very heavy, have a limited life span and can only discharge 50% of their stored energy. An advantage of these batteries is they are cheap and readily available. A person relying on them for power in remote areas of Australia must monitor them carefully, watch how they are discharged and use a generator on cloudy days. A 100 amp hour battery of good quality can sell for $350 and be recharged about 300 times. You would expect a battery of this type fully charged to run a small refrigerator for 3 days without needing a recharge..

Today this has changed, as technology often does with the introduction of the Lithium battery (pictured above). Lithium batteries are very light, can be discharged down to 0% and can be recharged over 800 times. This a real advantage for people who need a superior performing, longer lasting battery. The downside is its cost. A 100 amp hour lithium battery sells for around $1,500. You would expect a battery of this type to run a small refrigerator for 6-7 days without needing a recharge.

Now this becomes the problem for marketers. How to sell these lithium batteries. Below is a small chart comparing these batteries. At present, lithium ion batteries can not be recycled and end in landfill, a problem facing the Australian government.

 

 

Blog Stats

  • 28,089 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9 other followers

September 2020
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

NEWS FEEDS I FOLLOW RSS

Weather click pic

RSS Tesla Club news

  • Report: Tesla Cybertruck Reservations Exceed 1.25 Million August 5, 2021
    An online tracker of Tesla Cybertruck says the all-electric pickup now has more than 1.25 million orders. The first production units of the pickup are expected to roll off the line as soon as Tesla can get its Model Y production up and running. An actual production start date for the Cybertruck has not yet … Read more… The post Report: Tesla Cybertruck Reser […]
  • Rivian Considering International Factory August 3, 2021
    In addition to a potential new factory in Arizona, Rivian is looking to expand production outside the U.S. A Sky News report says the automaker is discussing a new factory with the British government to be built near Bristol. According to the report, talks are not yet at an advanced stage, and there are competing … Read more… The post Rivian Considering Inte […]
  • Tesla Settles Suit Over Model S Battery Voltage Reduction July 31, 2021
    Tesla has agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle a lawsuit claiming a software update reduced maximum battery voltage in 1,743 Model S sedans. The settlement will amount to pay out $625 to each owner affected.  Tesla has also attempted to fix the issue for owners. A Reuters report said the voltage limitation was temporary, … Read more… The post Tesla Settles S […]
  • Tesla Model 3: Three Year Review – Energy Used & Emissions (Part 3) July 31, 2021
    Part 3 of my three-year review covers: Energy Use and Carbon Emissions from driving 42,500 miles in our Model 3. Links to Parts 1-4 of the review are at the bottom. We drove 42,500 miles in the first three years. I calculated how many kWh of electricity were sent to my car to charge the … Read more… The post Tesla Model 3: Three Year Review – Energy Used […]

RSS LAND WARNINGS BOM

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.